Mildred Potash Author of “Millie and Cupcake”

Name :
Mildred Potash

Where do you live?
Bay Ridge Brooklyn, New York

Tell us a little about yourself (your education, family life, etc.) .
I graduated from the University of Phoenix on September 23, 2012 with an Associate’s degree of arts. I am now pursuing my Bachelor’s in multimedia & visual communication. I share my life with my rats, three dogs, a hamster, and a rabbit companion.

What is your genre?
Children’s book

When and why did you begin writing? (What inspired you to write your first book?)
My rats have inspired me to write my book. I got the idea from my own experiences with my pet rats. I also had a dream with part of my story in it. After I had that dream, I woke up, and wrote it all down.

What was the hardest part of writing your book?
The hardest part was putting the words together. I had everything down, I just needed to put everything in order.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?
Honestly, I never thought I would be writing a book. I would be receiving emails everyday about publishing a book and I would delete them right away. After a while, I started to think about a children’s book and that is when my ideas started to come in. I wrote and wrote and then I went blank and stopped for a while. After I had that dream with the rest of my story, that Is when I put the rest of the story together.

Do you have to travel much to market your book(s)?
Not right now. So far everything is local and online. I do hope I can travel one day.

Who designs your book covers?
I had my illustrator Jesse Jones design my illustrations and book cover.

What is your current project?
I am working on the follow-up to my first story and a few other projects.

What, if anything, are you reading now?
I am a Christian; I love reading inspirational books like Joyce Meyers. I am reading Joyce Meyers: Making good habits, breaking bad habits and Never give up!

What books and/or authors have influenced your life most?
I love reading Joyce Meyers books because it is inspirational and helps me.

Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?
Yes, I have a few websites.
One of my websites
Another of my websites
My facebook page
My publisher

Would you be kind enough to share a little of your current work with us?
Right now I am attending school and writing some more children stories.

Do you have anything else you would like to share with my readers?

You can purchase my book here

And here

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Introducing Machelle (Shelly) Truby

Name : Machelle (Shelly) Truby

Where do you live?: Beaverton, Oregon (just outside of Portland)

Tell us a little about yourself (your education, family life, etc.)

I currently live in Beaverton, Oregon, with my sweet husband Michael. We were married once before when we were 20 years old, but it didn’t work out back then, likely due to our immaturity.

I remarried shortly after that, and badly I might say. That marriage lasted far too long for what it was. When that marriage came to an end a few years ago, I looked up Michael just to see what he was up to. Honestly and truly, I had NO thoughts of a relationship starting up. I was just curious what he was up to. He was single at the time, having been in a bad relationship himself for a while. We began talking, daily after a short while, and discovered how much we had in common. I was living in California and he was here in Beaverton, where we left off all those years ago. We got reacquainted over the phone, talking for hours each day until we finally decided to meet again in person.

It was all over but the shouting when we saw each other. Love at second sight! We fell madly in love and were remarried shortly thereafter. We have been married now for about two and a half years. He is the man I always dreamed of spending my life with, a man I was sure did not exist. He loves me, adores me, dotes over me and gives me everything in this relationship that I could ever desire or expect. He truly is my soul mate.

As for my overall life in general… I was born a few miles from here in Portland. My life growing up was nothing spectacular or glamorous. Being the child of a broken marriage, much of my childhood was spent moving to new towns with my mother and her various boyfriends and a couple of husbands and getting used to new schools and kids every few months, so I rarely had any friends outside of my brother, Dennis. We even did a little time in a foster home… about two years I think it was. That drew Dennis and me closer together and made us very protective of each other.

During the summers, Dennis and I would spend a couple of months back up here in Beaverton with our Dad. Dad was quite creative and into every kind of craft you could imagine: woodcarving, silver jewelry making, furniture crafting, gunsmithing… you name it, he dabbled in it. He also did the occasional oil painting of wild animals, such as deer, bears or lions. We spent a lot of time with him in his shop learning how to solder, file, carve and all. His philosophy of life in general was something I just naturally gravitated to from there. Do good works and help people to grow while you grow yourself.

What is your genre?

Lately, for the past few years, I have been into children’s illustrations. I create little animal characters that fit story lines for tales my nephews are helping me to put together.

Do you have a specific artistic style?

Being completely uneducated in art, I don’t even know what to call my style. Maybe some of your readers will be able to name it, as I cannot. I do like detail in my art, so my paintings take a while to finish. They are typically very colorful, full of light and elaborate backgrounds of mountains, trees, veldts, flowering bushes and such. I love creating little animal characters and giving them lives that somewhat mirror ours as humans, but giving them problems that being animals they might encounter, such as a frog being a possible meal for a pack of hungry lion cubs.

When and why did you begin illustrating? (What inspired you to illustrate your first book?)

I only discovered digital media about 8 years ago. Talk about an eye opener! Digital was so easy for me. I could forget about the mess and the smell of oils, which was a stumbling block in my tiny living spaces. I bought myself a Wacom drawing tablet and pen. My software, Corel Painter 6 at the time, could mimic any medium you could imagine: oil, acrylic, watercolor, even Sumi ink. The painting is done in layers and once you get the hang of it, creating your piece is easy and you can readily change things without creating a huge mess in your work.

I don’t even remember what started me in doing a children’s illustrative type of work. I just started doodling in Painter one day, creating a picture of three frogs singing on a lily pad in a pond, and there I went. When I started painting my animal characters, my two nephews got involved and started making up stories to go with them. I created two characters based on my nephews: Garrett the Gator and Steele the lion. Garrett is a little daredevil who is into all sorts of trouble all the time, but manages to make it out of trouble each time by using his wits and his personality. Steele is a lion cub who starts out timid and the victim of bullying by the rest of his lion pride. He is different, being short and stubby with no real lion skills, but he finds out along the way that he is way more than the other lions want him to believe that he is.

What is the hardest part of illustrating?

The hardest thing for me is finding the time these days to get anything done. I have a day job, a husband (whom I adore and love spending time with), a house to keep up and a father who has Alzheimer’s and dementia. I try to spend a couple of evenings a week with him to keep him out of trouble. He also has stage four cancer, so it won’t be long before life takes yet another turn for us.

When did you first consider yourself an artist?

I did not even know I could draw until I was eighteen when Dad sat me down and had me try to draw a picture from a matchbook cover, you know the ones that used to advertise an art school. “Can you draw this? If you can, you might be an artist!” It was a deer head. I sat there and drew it, pencil and paper, with Dad’s direction. He told me how to look at it in perspective, paying attention to negative space and all that. It turned out pretty well, I think.

Dad was excited at the results. So, we spent the next eight hours or so with him doing an oil painting of a lion from start to finish and going through all the steps with me. He explained how to “see” things that you are trying to paint, from far away to near, paying attention to highlights and shadows to give the thing depth. His painting turned out beautifully and for me it was that old light bulb turning on over my head. It was on and was not going out.

From that point, I bought pencils, paper, oil and acrylic paints, canvas, brushes and cans of stinky turpentine. I spent a lot of my time just examining things around me; trees, flowers, animals, buildings… and all the colors in the world! It all looked different then to me, looking for color changes, highlights, shapes, etc. I began painting, mostly animals from pictures in books, and sometimes I would set up my easel outdoors to paint flowers, trees and mountains.

Do you have help with your designs?

No, not really, beyond my nephews giving me ideas for scenes to paint in the story we are working on at the time. I get a mental picture of it and begin. But the painting somewhat “tells me” what it is to become. It’s a strange sort of living thing in my head that drives me to let it out. My mind seems to go deep into the details, behind, under and around the thing I am painting, feeling and seeing the shapes, their effect on each other and the effect of their surroundings. Kind of hard to put into words, but maybe other artists will get it and can verbalize it better.

What have you learned in the process of illustrating that you can share with others?

With digital, I have learned a bit about planning and sorting through layers of a painting, working from front to back with the concepts my father started me with. I have a lot to learn about discipline, though. Maybe it is just that I am not sure what direction to go in. I just like to paint out of my head, going with whatever mood I am in at the time.

What is your current project?

I would really like to finish illustrating a story book about bullying and self-confidence with my little lion cub, Steele, and a little green tree frog named Riley, who Steele rescues from becoming dinner for the mean and hungry pack of lion cubs that torment them.

Would you be kind enough to share a little of your current work with us? Pictures?

Sure, here you go:
Eye to eye
Pets on a leash
Frog chorus

Do you see the art of an illustrator as a career?

I don’t see that yet. I am told I am a good artist, but trying to get noticed for me is like trying to climb a mountain with no legs. I know some have done it, but how they manage it is a mystery to me.

What, if anything, are you reading now?

I used to read a lot of science fiction novels, but lately I read short news articles or human interest articles. Occasionally, I will poke around in an Anne Rice book (what is it about vampires that attracts me, I’ll never know). Not much time for books with my crazy life as it is.

Are there any new authors that have grasped your interest?

I have weird tastes in that area, I guess. I like the Sookie Stackhouse series of stories by Charlaine Harris. The stories are about our world being full of vampires, werewolves, fairies and all. Corny and fun, but spooky and dark all wrapped up into one.

What books and/or authors have influenced your life most?

Frank Herbert, Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. I love the story lines. Their ability to describe scenes and make you see them in your mind simply amaze me. And some of their science fiction concepts are actually being looked at by scientists as viable and workable for space travel. Why I never became a sci fi artist is beyond me. Sweet little animal characters are a far cry from the gigantic and elaborate space craft and gnarly alien creatures that I could be creating. Go figure.

Name your favorite illustrator and what it is about their work that has won your favoritism?

Patrick Woodroffe’s books with his stories and illustrations will always be a part of my personal library. His fantastical style and his incredibly detailed work always fascinated me. He is not that well known, I guess, but when I discovered him, I could not get enough. I would spend hours with a magnifying glass just looking at all the detail and admiring his style.

Do you have any advice and/or tips for other illustrators?

Do what you love and don’t let others drive your style. If you have a passion, pursue it. Let your mind wander and explore the surroundings in your work. There is detail there that is begging to be seen.

There is value in emulating the style of others, but don’t be a copycat. Take what you learn from others and make it your own.

Lately I am finding out that there is value in networking and just tossing out a painting or two among artists of other crafts will get me farther down the road than just posting my paintings all over in online galleries. I guess that’s how you found me, huh?

Is there anything else you would like to say to your readers?

You never know what you can do until you try. You might do badly at something or you might even fail miserably, but if you never try, you will never know what you can do. Look at me. I could only draw stick people until I was eighteen when my Dad showed me that I could draw and paint. Your mind is just waiting to be lit up!

Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?
My website
And
My prints for sale

Posted in Children's books, Illustrator Interview, Machelle Truby | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Graham Austin Author of “Liam and the Grump”

Where do you live?

A little village in south eastern England called Snodland

Tell us a little about yourself (your education, family life, etc.)

I’m a father of four and married to a woman who was mad enough to put up with me. I’ve studied international relations, law and politics but have always wanted to write.

What is your genre?
I write children’s fiction for 4-8yr olds but am also working on a novel.

When and why did you begin writing? (What inspired you to write your first book?)
I’ve been writing for years. I used to make up stories for my step-kids in my first marriage. “Liam and the Grump” was written with my 6yr old son as we walked to and from school.

What was the hardest part of writing your book?
Finding the right mix of crazy scary and silly. My book deals with controlling your temper and “the grump” is Liam’s temper actually brought to life. It’s not a terribly attractive creature and so I had to work to keep the story light as it could have easily crossed the line and scared some kids.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?
I think I first considered myself a writer when one of the kids who have read the story asked for a sequel. That was a good feeling.

Do you have to travel much to market your book(s)?
I market a lot on social media so I haven’t traveled much. I am doing a tour of local schools at the moment so we will see how things go.

Who designs your book covers?
Sarah, who illustrated Liam and the Grump, did the cover for this one.

What is your current project?
I have another book on the go with Sarah called Naomi and the Lost Smile. I am also working on another book at the same time with another illustrator called Captain Pegleg and the Greatest Treasure. In addition I am writing my fantasy novel. That and having three kids under 7 makes for a busy house!

What, if anything, are you reading now?
I read constantly. I just reread Patrick Rothfuss books and I’m looking for something new now.

What books and/or authors have influenced your life most?
Wow this could be a long list… Tolkien and C.S Lewis for opening the doors to my imagination. William Horwood for making me realize how easy it is to stereotype.. Robert Munsch for teaching me children’s books are for the parents too.

Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?
My website is quite new. My website. My blog on Goodreads

Would you be kind enough to share a little of your current work with us?
It’s a bit hard to show my books without the pictures but a tiny snippet of my fantasy novel:

Devin leaned back against the broad trunk of the oak tree and sighed contentedly. The woods were still, with just the faintest hint of breeze rustling the leaves and gently caressing his face as the sunlight danced and weaved through the ever changing gaps in the canopy. It was the beginning of Autumn when Summer has not yet truly given in and there are still more warm days than crisp, and Devin was hiding. It wasn’t so much that he was avoiding the work itself, more that he was avoiding the boredom and drudgery of it. It helped alleviate his guilt somewhat if he justified it in those terms. That said, the guilt was not strong enough to stir him from the woods and bring him back to the village in time to help with the harvesting. Crops were for girls and men too old to hunt Devin had decided. The numerous young farm-hands in the village not being evidence to the contrary.

He ought to be hunting. He would catch an earful regardless but he had more chance of avoiding the worst if he came back with a deer or a brace of pheasant. Sighing wearily he hauled himself to his feet and took up his hunting bow. It wasn’t the greatest weapon by any means but it was one of the few things that Devin truly owned and he loved it with a fierce pride. Checking his pack to make sure all was still in order he set off at a light pace deeper into the woods.

He cut a slight figure. At less than five feet and slender he could, and had, been mistaken for a young girl on more than one occasion. His fair features did little to help this and Devin longed for the day when his beard would finally begin to sprout in earnest. He was dressed simply in homespun and a sturdy travelling cloak, hardly the ideal clothing for trying to find a deer but at least they were a few days on him and wouldn’t carry the scent of soap.

Devin had always been at home in the woods. Indeed the woods felt more like home to him than the Widdengate. The village had taken he and his mother in when they had stumbled in out of the dark one night. They had been travelling with a caravan of wagons into Saravel when they had been attacked by bandits. The caravan guards had been no match for the bandits whose hunger was more of an incentive than the paltry pay of the guards and those who hadn’t been slain in the fight had quickly thrown down their weapons and probably joined up with the bandits. Devin remembered that night clearly. The face of Garrit the grizzled old wagoneer as he crouched down low behind the rear of the wagon whispering urgently to Devin’s mother. He had only been six or seven at the time but the memory was etched into him as clear as if it had happened yesterday. Most of that wild night was a blur, running away from the wagons and the screaming and clash of steel. Stumbling through the dark for what seemed like hours before finally collapsing with his sobbing mother under the trees. They had been lost in the woods for three days before they broke out and spotted the village.

Devin shook his head as if to shake the memory loose and stepped lightly over the small stream and further into the woods. He had been alone for some years now. His mother had fallen to a fever that struck villages in the district and for the last three years Devin had been alone. The village looked after him in a fashion, he always had food and a bed in which to sleep but nobody actually cared for him. Devin frequently felt that he could vanish and no-one would truly care and it was that reason, more than any other, that drew him to the woods – to solitude. It was in the depth of the woods that Devin could allow himself to be a child. In these woods he had been the greatest hunter. He had fought off ravaging Bjornmen. He had fought dragons and barrow revenants. He was not a child though, no longer. That child had died shortly after his mother.

Do you have anything else you would like to share with my readers?
1) my book on Amazon and it is currently 50% off.

2) I am having a free download day around July 22nd so check the blog for details.
3) Captain Pegleg should be out at the end of July.
4) Follow me on facebook follow me on facebook and follow me here also

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Introducing Tanya Chang and “The Littlest Knight”

Name :
Tanya Chang

Where do you live?
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Tell us a little about yourself (your education, family life, etc.)
Writing a book had never really crossed my mind until recently. Growing up, my passion has always been primarily in music, but I tend to dabble here and there, wanting to explore as many ways to artistically express myself as possible. I’ve always been very practical and I studied Management and Information Systems in university, which led to a career in IT support, so all the “artsy” stuff is what keeps me going on the side.

I’ve lived in the Ottawa area almost my entire life. Outside of being a mom and my career, I enjoy singing and dancing (both which I studied for many years), I’m a musician in a concert band, and I perform regularly in local musical theatre productions. In fact, my illustrator (Darren Bird) and I met while performing in a small ensemble for a local theatre group. Just a few months later, we appeared in a production of “White Christmas” in which he played Phil Davis, and I was Rita, the showgirl. It was during this production that I first saw some of Darren’s illustrations, and that’s when I seriously considered that maybe I might be able to, one day, see my book in print.

What is your genre?
Children’s books

When and why did you begin writing? (What inspired you to write your first book?)
I’ve actually been writing almost all my life, but I didn’t really appreciate the power of the written word until I was in middle school. It was at that time that I began to enjoy reading, and I started keeping a diary. In high school, I explored journalism – and I almost pursued journalism in university – and then I ventured into poetry, “fan fiction”, and script writing.

THE LITTLEST KNIGHT actually came about because I really wanted to write something for my son. I used to write a lot of poetry, but for some reason, inspiration in that genre hasn’t come so easily to me in recent years, so the next option was to try and come up with a children’s story. My husband and I enjoy our annual trips to the Sterling Renaissance Festival, so that gave me the setting for the story. Then, the characters started to form as I observed the differences in personalities and the relationships between Cole and his pre-school friends.

What was the hardest part of writing your book?
The most difficult part of writing anything for me is coming up with the initial idea. Once I have that starting point, I can build upon it, but it has to be a concrete enough idea that I can start visualizing the story in my head.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?
I think I needed to hear positive feedback from at least half a dozen people before I realized that I had actually done a good job. I’ve considered myself a writer for a long time – writing is the easiest way for me to express my thoughts – but now I feel like I can actually call myself an author.

Do you have to travel much to market your book(s)?
I haven’t traveled to market the book, but I’ve pounded the pavement a bit, and I’ve done a lot of research into marketing on the internet. Personal connections can count for a lot when self-publishing, and we received our first international sale within a day of releasing the book. (Since I’m in Canada, that sale was to the U.S.) I’m still looking forward to the first overseas sale.

Who designs your book covers?
Darren and I worked together to design the book cover.

What is your current project?
Right now I’m working on translating THE LITTLEST KNIGHT into French, and I have a follow-up story in my head. (I just need to come up with that initial concrete idea on which I can build the entire story.)

What, if anything, are you reading now?
I just recently picked up a copy of Dan Brown’s Inferno. I don’t often get much time to read, but I really enjoy his novels.

And, as part of our son’s nightly bedtime routine, we read children’s books in both French and English almost every night.

What books and/or authors have influenced your life most?

One of the books that I absolutely adored when I was little was “The Tall Book of Make Believe”. It’s a compilation of short stories and poems written before 1950. I still have the book, and I remember all the mischief making by the characters in some of the stories. I think this book helped me tap into my imagination because you can’t really appreciate those stories without being able to picture everything vividly in your mind.

I also really enjoyed all of Lucy Maud Montgomery’s works while growing up, and the Winnie the Pooh stories by A.A. Milne.

Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

My Website
My Blog
The Littlest Knight on Facebook

My illustrator’s Blog

Would you be kind enough to share a little of your current work with us?

All I can really share is that it will be another “Littlest Knight” story.

Do you have anything else you would like to share with my readers?

Reading is so important in any child’s life. Read to your children, and encourage them to use their imagination by making up stories of their own. You may even want to write those stories in a journal for them, so they can see just how creative they are.

For me, the combination of writing and other artistic outlets has made my life so much richer, and I can only hope that everyone else can find their joy in these things as well.

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V. R. Duin Children’s Book Author

Name : V. R. Duin is the pen name of Terry Verduin

Where do you live? Palm Beach County, FL

Tell us a little about yourself (your education, family life, etc.)

Florida Disability Attorney, lives on a small horse farm.

What is your genre?

Rhyming, illustrated picture books.

When and why did you begin writing? (What inspired you to write your first book?)

The complications, standardization and limitations of today’s school curriculum prompted me to develop a blend of traditional and contemporary readers that would hold children’s attention for supplemental learning at home. In addition, I noted that rhyming verse had fallen out of favor in mainstream. Work with disability law indicated that rhyming helps all children sound out words as they learn to read, and it is more memorable than prose. At a time when holidays are also largely verboten in schools, I incorporated holidays into my work. My first two books were published in 2009.

What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Deliberate and painstaking edits – over and over again – often enduring for years.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

Reader-response to my platform influenced the transition.

Do you have to travel much to market your book(s)?

Travel has not been a large part of my promotional effort. However, I have visited schools and libraries in Kentucky and North Carolina in addition to my local school visits in Palm Beach, County, Florida.

Who designs your book covers?

Bonnie Lemaire, the wonderful illustrator of each of V. R. Duin’s books, working in collaboration with the author. However, increasingly, Bonnie’s ultimate discretion has taken the controls. She now has the final decision on cover design as well as on most illustrations.

What is your current project?

Currently, the 8 published books are being revised to list all titles and the website in each, for reader convenience. We are also seeking to transition from self-published to mainstream.

What, if anything, are you reading now?

Outliers, The Story of Success, by Malcolm Gladwell.

What books and/or authors have influenced your life most?

My editing team has been more critical than any book(s) or any other author(s).

Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

V.R. Duin website

The Facebook Fan Clubs (Goopy Ghost, Little Ray and V. R. Duin) operate like blogs. They may be accessed from the website and are full of fun and information.

We also have a social presence on Twitter, Google and Linked-In.

Would you be kind enough to share a little of your current work with us?

There are 12 manuscripts in the line-up, including four more sequels for the Goopy Ghost series, one for Little Ray’s series and an unpublished trilogy. The rest are independent titles, like The Foxy Armadillos.

Do you have anything else you would like to share with my readers?

The Accelerated Reader questions (see: website) for the books are in use in numerous schools and libraries as well as in households across the country. Four video trailers show the animation potential of the V. R. Duin book characters for film, television, live entertainment and interactive media. They are used at readings. In place are registered trademarks for the Goopy Ghost book series, for allied products and for the V. R. Duin pen name. A complete platform, showing commercial potential, seems essential in today’s hugely competitive market.

Posted in Author Interview, Children's books, Goopy Ghost, Little Ray, V. R. Duin | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Manon Massari – Author, Illustrator

Name :

Manon Daniels (Massari)

Where do you live?

Wicklow, Ireland

Tell us a little about yourself (your education, family life, etc.)

I grew up in South Africa. My parents emigrated from Holland shortly after the 2nd World War.
I am one of eight children and grew up experiencing all the joys of a large family. I attended Iona Convent and then secondary school at Clapham High in Pretoria.
I always loved art and studied at the Italian School of Art after I finished secondary school. I then went to study nursing at Grey’s Hospital in Pietermaritzburg, Natal.

After I completed my studies I married my first husband, Michael Kuhn, and in 1990 we adopted a beautiful baby girl. We named her Gabrielle. Michael died three years later and I home schooled my daughter on our farm in Mooiplaats, near Pretoria for the duration of the Foundation Phase.

I began teaching at St. John the Baptist Catholic School where Gabrielle also attended and where I met Ivano. We got married four years later. Ivano later transferred to another school and I remained at St. John’s for 15 years.

What is your genre?

As an author – illustrated children’s books.
As an artist I work with various genres such as fantasy, humour and novellas.

When and why did you begin writing? (What inspired you to write your first book?)

We immigrated to Ireland in 2010 and it was in this beautiful country of saints and scholars that I felt inspired to fulfil a lifelong dream of writing an illustrated children’s book. After all the years of teaching I now found the time and desire to turn back to my art. My husband and I have the joy of being able to collaborate on different projects such as his first novel, Sirion, which I illustrated.

What was the hardest part of writing your book?

Trying to visualize what I wanted to say through the eyes of a child and to hold the audience’s interest as well as ensuring that illustrations would trigger the child’s imagination.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?

When Gypsy Shadow Publishing accepted my book for publication. I really felt like a writer then.

Do you have to travel much to market your book(s)?

All over the world, via the internet. At this stage Lucy’s Dreams is only available as an eBook. I’m hoping to have it in hardcopy in the near future.

Who designs your book covers?

I do my own cover illustrations.

What is your current project?

I am working on the sequel to Lucy’s Dreams as well as freelance projects in conjunction with other authors. In addition I am working on several colouring books and illustrating my husband’s books.

What, if anything, are you reading now?

A book called Silence, by Shusaku Endo. It concerns the seventeenth-century martyrdom of a Portuguese missionary.

What books and/or authors have influenced your life most?

Beatrix Potter, Enid Blyton, A.A. Milne, Cicely Mary Barker and her Flower Fairy books, the Brothers Grimm, the Mother Goose poems and Alison Utley’s Grey Rabbit series.

Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?

Manon’s website

Manon’s on facebook

Would you be kind enough to share a little of your current work with us?

The sequel to Lucy’s Dreams and the freelance projects I mentioned earlier.

Do you have anything else you would like to share with my readers?

I was very happy that Lucy’s Dreams did well in the Preditors and Editors poll and received 3rd place in the children’s book category, 6th place for front cover art work and 2nd place for illustrations.

Posted in Author Interview, Children's books, Illustrator Interview | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Ramonda Richard Author of Robert the Bully

Name:
Ramonda Richard

Where do you live?
Alma,Arkansas

Tell us a little about yourself (your education, family life, etc.)
I am a mother of three grown children and grandmother of eleven. I am trying to make a difference and change the bullying issue in our schools as I feel bullying is an issue that truly needs to be addressed.

What is your genre?
Children’s book

When and why did you begin writing? (What inspired you to write your first book?)
This is my first book and I wrote it after the first Virginia Tech shootings happened to try to reach the younger generation of children and teach them not to be bullies.

What was the hardest part of writing your book?
Trying to get what I wanted to say on paper that was in my mind and my heart.

When did you first consider yourself a writer?
When they first wanted to publish my book several years ago and another company wanted to publish my poems also but I did not have the money to go with those companies.

Do you have to travel much to market your book(s)?
No, can’t travel much right now unless someone comes to get me. I don’t have a car.

Who designs your book covers?
I let the illustrators through my publishing company make it.

What is your current project?
I am working on more poems and thinking about writing a second children’s book and possibly a novel after I get this book off of the ground as this cause for the children is very important to me.

What, if anything, are you reading now?
James Patterson books

What books and/or authors have influenced your life most?
Dean Koontz,James Patterson, Stephen King, Ann Rule

Do you have a blog/website? If so what is it?
I do not have a blog or website. However, you can find my book at these locations on the internet:
Robert the Bully on Amazon
On Barnes&Noble
Email Me
Ramonda on facebook
Robert the Bully is also on ebay.com as well as many other places. You can also call: 1-301-228-3853. They are $24.95 plus four something for shipping. I’m sorry I don’t make the prices. But please keep in mind this is for a good cause, the good of the children.

Would you be kind enough to share a little of your current work with us?
I will share the last page.
And so he did, he told everyone he was sorry and he didn’t mean to make them feel bad. After that they were all very good friends and Robert never picked on them or anyone else again because he knew how it felt to be sad and not have any friends. Also, he felt bad for how he had made everyone feel and he DID NOT LIKE that feeling. Other animals learned from Robert’s mistakes and were not mean to anyone either and all of the animals were friends and nobody was mean to anyone and they lived Happily Ever After.
THE END

Do you have anything else you would like to share with my readers?
Yes, in the front of my book there is a dedication page and a poem that I wrote to the families and victims of the school shootings. I would like to share those.
Dedication Page:
I would like to dedicate this book to the victim’s and families of all of the school shootings. I am in no way saying that the cause of the school shootings is because of bullying but, I think the bullying in the schools is something that truly needs to be addressed. I know what it feels like to be picked on and made fun of. I think that everyone should get along and no one should pick on or make fun of anyone just because they are different. If we were all the same, this world would be boring. This is for the one’s injured in the midst of the school violence. May God be with you and my prayers are with you.
This book is also dedicated to my three children. Crystal, Misty, and Weldon Jr. And my Grandchildren, Dayton, Anthony, Jeremiah, Cierra, Tradden, Arissia, Crystelle, Malaki, Akya, Tei Shannah, and Whakeem.

Poem to the Victim’s and Families
This poem is to the families of each and every one.
The children and teachers who lost their lives, they could not run.
No matter how hard they tried to keep the killer at bay.
They lost their lives on that very mournful day.
I can’t imagine what it must be like to lose a child,
The feelings you must feel, they can’t be mild.
I’m glad it’s not me, but I also wish it wasn’t you.
No parent should ever have to bury their baby,
This world we live in nowadays has gotten so crazy.
I know this poem will not make it better,
Just words of encouragement, like I would in a letter.
My heart goes out to each and every one of you,
I send my love and prayers, to each of you they are due.

Posted in Author Interview, Bullying, Children's books, Ramonda Richard, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment